Stuart Condie

Stuart Condie has written several articles and chapters in trade press and magazines whilst working in the aviation industry. He has recently completed a two year creative writing certificate course at Sussex University in Brighton, UK, and is a founder member of the Sussex Scribes writing group.

Stuart has written over twenty short stories from flash to 8000 words; three stories have been published in anthologies in the UK and USA, another four have done well in competitions (two firsts, a third and a commendation) with a further two stories due for publication in 2014.

Stuart has Masters Degrees from Cambridge and City Universities, is married with two daughters, and spends most of his time in Sussex and France. His web page is hosted by New Writing South and he is also working on a draft novel.

Book Reviews by Stuart Condie

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Memento Mori

The title of Muriel Spark’s Momento Mori refers to the Latin phrase for “Remember, you must die,” and it is this phrase which an unknown prank telephone caller repeats to a series of elderly people throughout the novel. The setting is 1950s London replete with bomb sites, and the elderly are all part of a close-knit community of the well-heeled and their servants and ex-servants.

The main characters are Dame Lettie Colston, her brother Godfrey, his wife Charmian, and their former servant (Jean) Taylor. The latter resides in the Maud Long Medical Ward with other elderly inmates c...

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The Comforters

Summary:

Laurence Manders is a nice young man, a reporter for the BBC, whose family varies between the gypsy-like independent grandmother, Louisa, and his mother, the rather distant and naïve Lady Manners. Lord Manders barely features as he is always away on retreat or about to go on a retreat.

Laurence becomes worried both about his former lover, Caroline, who claims to be plagued by a phantom typewriter which narrates her thoughts and deeds, and his grandmother who appears to be conducting a diamond smuggling racket with the aid of some unlikely friends.

Caroline is ...

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The Comedienne

The Comedienne is a very misleading title; the book has nothing to do with those acting in a comedic capacity, but is a translation of a Polish word which refers to an actress playing in the garden theatres of Warsaw in the 1890s. There is a double sense to the word in Polish-- it can also mean a deceiver or temptress—and herein lies the problem with this novel.

I was intrigued by The Comedienne as the first novel (in 1895)of an author who won the Nobel prize in 1924 over his rivals Thomas Mann, Maxim Gorky and Thomas Hardy, all of whom are much better known today than Reymont.  

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